Science proved you and your Rotweiller fall in love when you look in each other’s eyes

Dog owners already know in their bones that they and their pets love one another. Now, a new study has confirmed it, finding that love is chemically apparent after dogs and their owners gaze into one another’s eyes.

Rotweiller
Rotweiller

The study, conducted by researchers at several Japanese universities and published in the journal Science, consisted of two parts. In the first, the researchers watched 30 dog owners interact with their dogs for half an hour, and then measured both human and dog levels of oxytocin. (Oxytocin, sometimes referred to as the “love hormone” or the “bonding hormone,” is fundamental to human intimacy; it is released during sex and creates attachment between couples, and also plays a role in mother-child bonding.)

Rotweiller
Rotweiller

The researchers found that the owners whose dogs stared at them the longest had the highest oxytocin levels. Moreover, the oxytocin levels of owners and dogs were correlated: If an owner had high levels after they interacted, the dog likely did too.

As a control group, the researchers repeated the same process with wolves who were raised by humans, paired with someone who raised them. There was no evidence of any effect on oxytocin levels.

Rotweiller
Rotweiller

The second part of the study tried to tease out whether the oxytocin actually caused the lengthened gaze. To do this, the researchers administered oxytocin to a new group of dogs, and the watched them interact with their owners. Strangely, oxytocin administered to female dogs led to much higher levels in both the dogs and their owners. But that effect wasn’t present in male dogs, and researchers weren’t sure why.

Rotweiller
Rotweiller

Overall, the results suggest that as dogs became domesticated, they might have developed a mutually beneficial ability to bond with humans the same way that we bond with each other. In an essay on the study published in Science, Evan MacLean and Brian Hare, both cognitive scientists at Duke, write, “dogs have taken advantage of our parental sensitivities—using behaviors such as staring into our eyes—to generate feelings of social reward and caretaking behavior.” In other words, dogs learned to evoke the same love that parents feel for their children.

Rotweiller
Rotweiller

Must-read

7 types of Household chores your Rottweiler can help you with

We all hate doing household chores and cleaning the mess our pooches tend to make every single hour. But what if they clean up...

6 signs your Rottweiler is jealous of your phone

Rottweilers by their nature require a lot of attention. You might have noticed your Rottie barks constantly every time you get a phone call....

5 Best Rottweiler-Friendly Vacation Destinations

Nothing seems fantastic than having your lovely Rottweiler by your side when you are traveling. It actually seems difficult to leave your Rottie at...

How Do You Calculate Calories in Dog Food?

Dogs are often referred to as a man's best friend, a relationship that started almost 23,000 years ago when people domesticated dogs for security,...

Can Rottweiler Puppies Eat Adult Dog Food?

Have you recently got a Rottweiler Puppy and looking for what you can feed him on? Well if that's the case then you might...

Top Ways To Create A Pet Friendly Home Every Owner Should Consider

As a pet owner, you know what it's like to love your furry friends. You go out of your way to make sure they...
1,530,000FansLike
219,000FollowersFollow
2,237FollowersFollow
223,000FollowersFollow
3,330FollowersFollow
460,000SubscribersSubscribe

Recent articles

More like this